MBB succeeding in the classroom

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PeteRasche
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MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by PeteRasche »

I know this board is mostly gonna say "so what?", but I received an email from Tulane which said that for the Fall semester, the mens' basketball team had:
- Program record 3.44 team GPA
- 12 players above a 3.0 GPA
- 2 players with a 4.0 GPA

Nice work.
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by Yankeewave »

Should help with parents whenn recruiting
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by TUPF »

PeteRasche wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 12:47 pm I know this board is mostly gonna say "so what?", but I received an email from Tulane which said that for the Fall semester, the mens' basketball team had:
- Program record 3.44 team GPA
- 12 players above a 3.0 GPA
- 2 players with a 4.0 GPA

Nice work.
Not me. I love academics as much as I do sports and it's fantastic. I had no chance of playing sports past high school so I admire those who are able to combine excellence in both even more so.
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by sprout1550 »

This is what I love about Tulane. Student athletes that are really students....
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by Baywave1 »

I know it was a while ago but about five or so years ago the MBB average hovered around 2.0 and may have been below the Mendoza line.

If I had seen those results without a Subject Line, I would have guessed it was the sailing team.

Kudos to all concerned for turning this around.
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by NJwave »

We should be proud of this. The odds of any these guys earning a real living playing basketball is not great. I'm glad to see they all are preparing themselves for life after Tulane.
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by wavedom »

NJwave wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:50 pm We should be proud of this. The odds of any these guys earning a real living playing basketball is not great. I'm glad to see they all are preparing themselves for life after Tulane.
Well according to DC greenie they are just getting crap degrees.

To be clear I don't agree with that assessment and congratulate the team for doing so well.
We still aren't there!
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by waverider »

I too have always took pride in the fact that athletes are getting Tulane degrees in Advanced Basketweaving. It sets them up for success in life beyond the court/field/etc.

A lot of people like to correlate high GPAs with low athletic rankings but there are enough cases that show you can have both.
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by Carolina Greenie »

Say Pete,
Without naming names, how did your teammates compare re academic success and life after ball?

Just curious, (as we all know you are accomplished- and not just in your post totals....)
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

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Carolina Greenie wrote: Sat Jan 09, 2021 2:52 pm Say Pete,
Without naming names, how did your teammates compare re academic success and life after ball?

Just curious, (as we all know you are accomplished- and not just in your post totals....)
Almost all of my teammates seemed to do well enough. I don't think we were getting a team 3.0 but we weren't scraping the bottom on the edge of ineligibility either. I only remember talk of a few academic issues with teammates during my 5 years and they were mostly in summer classes which weren't needed to stay on track but rather would have put them ahead of schedule and/or lightened the remaining load during the school year (and season). But I know for a fact, because I attended the ceremonies and have pictures to prove it, that everyone who came in as a freshman in the first two classes after basketball restarted (HS 89 & 90), and who stayed rather than transferring, graduated either on time or else the immediately-following summer (still easily considered "on time" to the NCAA). And they're all doing well in whatever fields they entered with their Tulane degrees after.

I can't speak to the guys who came in the next "generation" (mid to late 90s)... I think I heard there were issues there. I know we used the "exception" on at least one guy (for Tulane minimum requirements) and he still lasted only one year anyway... And that's only one of the things I heard.
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by GretnaGrn »

PeteRasche wrote: Sat Jan 09, 2021 3:07 pm
Carolina Greenie wrote: Sat Jan 09, 2021 2:52 pm Say Pete,
Without naming names, how did your teammates compare re academic success and life after ball?

Just curious, (as we all know you are accomplished- and not just in your post totals....)
Almost all of my teammates seemed to do well enough. I don't think we were getting a team 3.0 but we weren't scraping the bottom on the edge of ineligibility either. I only remember talk of a few academic issues with teammates during my 5 years and they were mostly in summer classes which weren't needed to stay on track but rather would have put them ahead of schedule and/or lightened the remaining load during the school year (and season). But I know for a fact, because I attended the ceremonies and have pictures to prove it, that everyone who came in as a freshman in the first two classes after basketball restarted (HS 89 & 90), and who stayed rather than transferring, graduated either on time or else the immediately-following summer (still easily considered "on time" to the NCAA). And they're all doing well in whatever fields they entered with their Tulane degrees after.

I can't speak to the guys who came in the next "generation" (mid to late 90s)... I think I heard there were issues there. I know we used the "exception" on at least one guy (for Tulane minimum requirements) and he still lasted only one year anyway... And that's only one of the things I heard.
Anecdotally, I was there at the same time as Pete and coincidentally wound up in multiple classes with multiple other players (we all seemed to schedule our non-major liberal arts requirements at the same time for some odd reason). They were all present, engaged in class discussions, and obviously doing the reading/work.
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by PeteRasche »

GretnaGrn wrote: Mon Jan 11, 2021 11:51 amAnecdotally, I was there at the same time as Pete and coincidentally wound up in multiple classes with multiple other players (we all seemed to schedule our non-major liberal arts requirements at the same time for some odd reason). They were all present, engaged in class discussions, and obviously doing the reading/work.
I've wondered at times whether our academic "behavior" (for lack of a better term) was ingrained in each of us pre-Tulane, or whether it was a function of us starting a program from scratch and "not knowing any better". Like, if there had been an existing program, there probably would have been upperclassmen who were taking it easy (whether by choice or because they were ahead in their studies), cutting classes, etc., and that would have set an example for the freshmen (or at least there might not have been the rigorous full-team study hall that we had that first semester in 1989). But since we were all new to the college thing, and we had mandatory full-team study hall that first semester, that level of academic involvement was all we knew of college academics. Looking back at it now, we probably were at an advantage over even non-athlete students, who are just thrown into their first semester away from home and expected to figure out how, when, and how much to study.

I was a good student at a fantastic college-prep high school, and I made (IIRC) a 3.2 my first semester of college, including setting the class curve in Calculus I (I'd had two years of AP Calc in high school). My first semester was insanely hard for any student, being the "weed out" classes in the Engineering curriculum, with Calc, Chemistry, Physics, and one other (can't remember), plus labs for several of those. Chem I was the GPA killer. The regimented schedule I had that first semester was a great thing, though absolutely physically exhausting (two days per week I got up around 4:45 am and wasn't done with organized academic or athletic stuff until 9 pm).
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by TUPF »

Pete, there is a saying that the very first group, the startup, sets the tone forever. And that only happens when you are starting from scratch as opposed to replacing a few folks. In my case it was the first crew of a newly commissioned boat because that is the only time throughout the boats commissioned service of 30+ years that everyone is new. Part two, which you so aptly pointed out is that if the great majority of that new group are high achievers and mesh well it sets the foundation for high achievement. In your case you had great preparation. In my case that commissioning crew was made up almost to a man of "hot runners".

It can go the other way too. If you and your first group under Perry Clark had been subpar students the whole enterprise would have eaten itself pretty quickly even if you had been good on the court. People would have lost eligibility, gotten in off court (off boat :-)) troubles, and the wheels would have come off before we got to enjoy the Posse. Credit Perry and his staff for putting together your first group where the sum was much greater than the parts even if as you said, you didn't know any better. Success begets success but failure also begets failure and is so difficult to alter without pressing the reset button.
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

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PeteRasche wrote: Mon Jan 11, 2021 12:38 pm
GretnaGrn wrote: Mon Jan 11, 2021 11:51 amAnecdotally, I was there at the same time as Pete and coincidentally wound up in multiple classes with multiple other players (we all seemed to schedule our non-major liberal arts requirements at the same time for some odd reason). They were all present, engaged in class discussions, and obviously doing the reading/work.
I've wondered at times whether our academic "behavior" (for lack of a better term) was ingrained in each of us pre-Tulane, or whether it was a function of us starting a program from scratch and "not knowing any better". Like, if there had been an existing program, there probably would have been upperclassmen who were taking it easy (whether by choice or because they were ahead in their studies), cutting classes, etc., and that would have set an example for the freshmen (or at least there might not have been the rigorous full-team study hall that we had that first semester in 1989). But since we were all new to the college thing, and we had mandatory full-team study hall that first semester, that level of academic involvement was all we knew of college academics. Looking back at it now, we probably were at an advantage over even non-athlete students, who are just thrown into their first semester away from home and expected to figure out how, when, and how much to study.

I was a good student at a fantastic college-prep high school, and I made (IIRC) a 3.2 my first semester of college, including setting the class curve in Calculus I (I'd had two years of AP Calc in high school). My first semester was insanely hard for any student, being the "weed out" classes in the Engineering curriculum, with Calc, Chemistry, Physics, and one other (can't remember), plus labs for several of those. Chem I was the GPA killer. The regimented schedule I had that first semester was a great thing, though absolutely physically exhausting (two days per week I got up around 4:45 am and wasn't done with organized academic or athletic stuff until 9 pm).
Either FORTRAN (yep; we're that old) or English 101. I was an engineering major until I realized that was...not a major choice that matched my skills or preferences.
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by PeteRasche »

Gretna, you are right, I took FORTRAN/COBOL. English I (my only non-science elective) was second semester.

I'd hoped it would be as easy as BASIC programming (which I'd mastered on my Commodore 64 years prior! :mrgreen: ), but alas, it was just different enough that I had a tough time with it. Sadly it drove me away from computer programming (I didn't even want to touch C/+/++). It would have been useful to me to know some of that now.
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by PeteRasche »

BTW, since we're reminiscing about that first team back, today is the 31st anniversary of our upset over Memphis State that started it all.

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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by gerryb323 »

GretnaGrn wrote: Mon Jan 11, 2021 2:21 pm
PeteRasche wrote: Mon Jan 11, 2021 12:38 pm
GretnaGrn wrote: Mon Jan 11, 2021 11:51 amAnecdotally, I was there at the same time as Pete and coincidentally wound up in multiple classes with multiple other players (we all seemed to schedule our non-major liberal arts requirements at the same time for some odd reason). They were all present, engaged in class discussions, and obviously doing the reading/work.
I've wondered at times whether our academic "behavior" (for lack of a better term) was ingrained in each of us pre-Tulane, or whether it was a function of us starting a program from scratch and "not knowing any better". Like, if there had been an existing program, there probably would have been upperclassmen who were taking it easy (whether by choice or because they were ahead in their studies), cutting classes, etc., and that would have set an example for the freshmen (or at least there might not have been the rigorous full-team study hall that we had that first semester in 1989). But since we were all new to the college thing, and we had mandatory full-team study hall that first semester, that level of academic involvement was all we knew of college academics. Looking back at it now, we probably were at an advantage over even non-athlete students, who are just thrown into their first semester away from home and expected to figure out how, when, and how much to study.

I was a good student at a fantastic college-prep high school, and I made (IIRC) a 3.2 my first semester of college, including setting the class curve in Calculus I (I'd had two years of AP Calc in high school). My first semester was insanely hard for any student, being the "weed out" classes in the Engineering curriculum, with Calc, Chemistry, Physics, and one other (can't remember), plus labs for several of those. Chem I was the GPA killer. The regimented schedule I had that first semester was a great thing, though absolutely physically exhausting (two days per week I got up around 4:45 am and wasn't done with organized academic or athletic stuff until 9 pm).
Either FORTRAN (yep; we're that old) or English 101. I was an engineering major until I realized that was...not a major choice that matched my skills or preferences.
Same. Dating myself, I was in the middle of freshman computer programming class when classes were cancelled on September 11
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by TUPF »

I'm told you never knew pain until you were carrying an open box of FORTRAN punch cards over to the Computer Center on campus back in the day expecting to make a run until a trip and fall ruins your weekend.
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

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TUPF wrote: Mon Jan 11, 2021 4:27 pm I'm told you never knew pain until you were carrying an open box of FORTRAN punch cards over to the Computer Center on campus back in the day expecting to make a run until a trip and fall ruins your weekend.
Well, back when men were men, there were also large punch card decks for the compiler and assembler, say one to two feet in length. There was also a very small likelihood that all of those cards would read correctly!!
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by TUPF »

CT Wave wrote: Mon Jan 11, 2021 5:04 pm
TUPF wrote: Mon Jan 11, 2021 4:27 pm I'm told you never knew pain until you were carrying an open box of FORTRAN punch cards over to the Computer Center on campus back in the day expecting to make a run until a trip and fall ruins your weekend.
Well, back when men were men, there were also large punch card decks for the compiler and assembler, say one to two feet in length. There was also a very small likelihood that all of those cards would read correctly!!
:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: MBB succeeding in the classroom

Post by Marathon Wave »

PeteRasche wrote: Mon Jan 11, 2021 3:06 pm BTW, since we're reminiscing about that first team back, today is the 31st anniversary of our upset over Memphis State that started it all.
Thanks for posting this clip. I remember how wild Fogelman was. Great times.
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