Everything must go!

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OGSB
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Everything must go!

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TUPF
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Re: Everything must go!

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The dollar is the strongest it has been in awhile against the euro. If you have a few spare hundred million dollars or so lying around, could be bargain hunting time. :wink:
After you've been on fire under Arctic pack ice everything else is a walk in the park.
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Re: Everything must go!

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TUPF wrote:The dollar is the strongest it has been in awhile against the euro. If you have a few spare hundred million dollars or so lying around, could be bargain hunting time. :wink:
Actually, the dollar is supposed to get stronger in the next 12 months before starting to head back the other way. But point mostly taken :mrgreen:
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Re: Everything must go!

Post by ml wave »

WaveProf wrote:
TUPF wrote:The dollar is the strongest it has been in awhile against the euro. If you have a few spare hundred million dollars or so lying around, could be bargain hunting time. :wink:
Actually, the dollar is supposed to get stronger in the next 12 months before starting to head back the other way. But point mostly taken :mrgreen:
It's pretty foolish to put stock in currency predictions 12+ months out.
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Re: Everything must go!

Post by windywave »

ml wave wrote:
WaveProf wrote:
TUPF wrote:The dollar is the strongest it has been in awhile against the euro. If you have a few spare hundred million dollars or so lying around, could be bargain hunting time. :wink:
Actually, the dollar is supposed to get stronger in the next 12 months before starting to head back the other way. But point mostly taken :mrgreen:
It's pretty foolish to put stock in currency predictions 12+ months out.

:roll: :roll: you ever kill it with a long term fx trade?
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Re: Everything must go!

Post by doncecco »

Cash strapped is the least of the problems. Everything must go before it gets wet.
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ml wave
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Re: Everything must go!

Post by ml wave »

windywave wrote:
ml wave wrote:
WaveProf wrote:
TUPF wrote:The dollar is the strongest it has been in awhile against the euro. If you have a few spare hundred million dollars or so lying around, could be bargain hunting time. :wink:
Actually, the dollar is supposed to get stronger in the next 12 months before starting to head back the other way. But point mostly taken :mrgreen:
It's pretty foolish to put stock in currency predictions 12+ months out.

:roll: :roll: you ever kill it with a long term fx trade?
Indirectly, yes...and I'm not saying you can't make money doing so (professionals only, please), I'm saying anyone touting the dollar strengthening for 12 months then weakening is most likely flipping a coin.
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Re: Everything must go!

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Re: Everything must go!

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A lot of people suffering from budget unaccountability. To contrast the Italians, since that is what started the thread, they have had something like 45 leadership changes since WWII; the US has had 13. The Italian government has been haphazard for a long time, therefore people just go on living like there is no tomorrow i.e. no accountability. Some museum or billionaire will buy the art, so not to worry.

As for the Met, their examples are the state of New York and the US Federal Government, so what can you say? At least the feds can print money.
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Re: Everything must go!

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Rotorooter wrote: Wed Feb 10, 2021 9:19 am
A lot of people suffering from budget unaccountability. To contrast the Italians, since that is what started the thread, they have had something like 45 leadership changes since WWII; the US has had 13. The Italian government has been haphazard for a long time, therefore people just go on living like there is no tomorrow i.e. no accountability. Some museum or billionaire will buy the art, so not to worry.

As for the Met, their examples are the state of New York and the US Federal Government, so what can you say? At least the feds can print money.
I lived in Italy even as a teenager and have gone there many times for work since. It was apparent that the unintended consequence of a multiple party parliamentary system in Italy is that it breaks easily. After the old guard political party, the Christian Democrats, could no longer command a super majority after WWII there were a ton of little parties which held the golden tickets in loose coalitions. All it took was one p!ssed off politician or two to break the coalition and "dissolve" the parliamentary government. It happened multiple times while i was there. They just call a new election, lather rinse, and repeat. Most European Parliaments have multiple parties but none as splintered as Italy. In contrast we have had at most three parties at any given time and mostly just two since men no longer wore wigs. I don't know if Italian politics cause what you say Roto in terms of living for today. Rather I think politics are more a reflection of an Italian psyche that says La Dolce Vita is right in front of you today whereas tomorrow is not promised. I've always said I LOVE visiting and even living in Italy for short stints but I am too American and too get-things-done a person to live there permanently. It would drive you crazy.
After you've been on fire under Arctic pack ice everything else is a walk in the park.
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Re: Everything must go!

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TUPF wrote: Wed Feb 10, 2021 9:57 am
Rotorooter wrote: Wed Feb 10, 2021 9:19 am
A lot of people suffering from budget unaccountability. To contrast the Italians, since that is what started the thread, they have had something like 45 leadership changes since WWII; the US has had 13. The Italian government has been haphazard for a long time, therefore people just go on living like there is no tomorrow i.e. no accountability. Some museum or billionaire will buy the art, so not to worry.

As for the Met, their examples are the state of New York and the US Federal Government, so what can you say? At least the feds can print money.
I lived in Italy even as a teenager and have gone there many times for work since. It was apparent that the unintended consequence of a multiple party parliamentary system in Italy is that it breaks easily. After the old guard political party, the Christian Democrats, could no longer command a super majority after WWII there were a ton of little parties which held the golden tickets in loose coalitions. All it took was one p!ssed off politician or two to break the coalition and "dissolve" the parliamentary government. It happened multiple times while i was there. They just call a new election, lather rinse, and repeat. Most European Parliaments have multiple parties but none as splintered as Italy. In contrast we have had at most three parties at any given time and mostly just two since men no longer wore wigs. I don't know if Italian politics cause what you say Roto in terms of living for today. Rather I think politics are more a reflection of an Italian psyche that says La Dolce Vita is right in front of you today whereas tomorrow is not promised. I've always said I LOVE visiting and even living in Italy for short stints but I am too American and too get-things-done a person to live there permanently. It would drive you crazy.
Fair enough. The lack of political stability--we can agree on that--causes Italians not to change much or or rely on the government for much. Not to mention corruption, the Italians don't have a lock on that. I'm with you, my favorite place to visit, fantastic people, wine, food, weather. I could envision myself living there even, although it would have to be remote from a major city and not need a lot work on the property--no Home Depots over there and the labor is, how shall we say, slow. Cannot wait to go back, frankly, even though I have never been to Venice. Don't even have a favorite place, just like the vibe of it all.
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Re: Everything must go!

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Rotorooter wrote: Wed Feb 10, 2021 10:47 am
TUPF wrote: Wed Feb 10, 2021 9:57 am
Rotorooter wrote: Wed Feb 10, 2021 9:19 am
A lot of people suffering from budget unaccountability. To contrast the Italians, since that is what started the thread, they have had something like 45 leadership changes since WWII; the US has had 13. The Italian government has been haphazard for a long time, therefore people just go on living like there is no tomorrow i.e. no accountability. Some museum or billionaire will buy the art, so not to worry.

As for the Met, their examples are the state of New York and the US Federal Government, so what can you say? At least the feds can print money.
I lived in Italy even as a teenager and have gone there many times for work since. It was apparent that the unintended consequence of a multiple party parliamentary system in Italy is that it breaks easily. After the old guard political party, the Christian Democrats, could no longer command a super majority after WWII there were a ton of little parties which held the golden tickets in loose coalitions. All it took was one p!ssed off politician or two to break the coalition and "dissolve" the parliamentary government. It happened multiple times while i was there. They just call a new election, lather rinse, and repeat. Most European Parliaments have multiple parties but none as splintered as Italy. In contrast we have had at most three parties at any given time and mostly just two since men no longer wore wigs. I don't know if Italian politics cause what you say Roto in terms of living for today. Rather I think politics are more a reflection of an Italian psyche that says La Dolce Vita is right in front of you today whereas tomorrow is not promised. I've always said I LOVE visiting and even living in Italy for short stints but I am too American and too get-things-done a person to live there permanently. It would drive you crazy.
Fair enough. The lack of political stability--we can agree on that--causes Italians not to change much or or rely on the government for much. Not to mention corruption, the Italians don't have a lock on that. I'm with you, my favorite place to visit, fantastic people, wine, food, weather. I could envision myself living there even, although it would have to be remote from a major city and not need a lot work on the property--no Home Depots over there and the labor is, how shall we say, slow. Cannot wait to go back, frankly, even though I have never been to Venice. Don't even have a favorite place, just like the vibe of it all.
I have lived in Vicenza near Venice in northern Italy, Gaeta and Naples in the south, was based in Sardinia as a Cold War submariner, done business since in Rome, Genoa, and the Adriatic Coast, and have been a turista just about every place else. Took the wife on a 2 week trip find-her-roots tour before the pandemic, ending in Sicily. She loved Venice--you just shouldn't go during spring floods. Give me a shout before you plan. Agree 100% on the vibe.
After you've been on fire under Arctic pack ice everything else is a walk in the park.
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