Barbara Burke Retiring

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Johnny4
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Barbara Burke Retiring

Post by Johnny4 »

https://hawkeyesports.com/news/2022/06/ ... etirement/

Barbara Burke former Deputy AD and COO at Tulane, has announced she'll be retiring in June 2023. She was instrumental in the hiring of David Pierce for baseball and Jim Barnes for Volleyball (both at Tulane and Iowa). She was a finalist for the AD job to replace Rick Dickson in 2015.
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WaveProf
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Re: Barbara Burke Retiring

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Retiring at 65 on the nose. I'll never understand, and always slightly wonder about, people who have the means to retire at 65 (or younger) and choose not to. Good for her.
“We will expect success in all endeavors and be prepared to assess and hold ourselves accountable when we aren't successful. Tulane is a top 40 academic institution and it should expect nothing less from its athletic department.” --Troy Dannen 11.5.16
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Cheerleader
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Re: Barbara Burke Retiring

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WaveProf wrote: Sat Oct 01, 2022 2:39 pm Retiring at 65 on the nose. I'll never understand, and always slightly wonder about, people who have the means to retire at 65 (or younger) and choose not to. Good for her.
You are right about that, Prof. I quit the rat race at 62 and never looked back. I have friends who are in their late 70's and still working. I also have friends who retired and wondering why they didn't do it earlier. No one ever says, "I wish I had kept working instead of retiring". If you can afford it, it gives you a whole new life. I got to learn to play the bass guitar, lower my golf handicap, start and maintain a church, and travel around the world to see things I had only read about. It also gives you the opportunity to take better care of your health...less stress, more exercise, and frequent check ups. Life is short, don't waste it on the office if you don't have to. Believe it or not, you are replaceable there.
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Re: Barbara Burke Retiring

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Cheerleader wrote: Wed Oct 19, 2022 11:24 am
WaveProf wrote: Sat Oct 01, 2022 2:39 pm Retiring at 65 on the nose. I'll never understand, and always slightly wonder about, people who have the means to retire at 65 (or younger) and choose not to. Good for her.
You are right about that, Prof. I quit the rat race at 62 and never looked back. I have friends who are in their late 70's and still working. I also have friends who retired and wondering why they didn't do it earlier. No one ever says, "I wish I had kept working instead of retiring". If you can afford it, it gives you a whole new life. I got to learn to play the bass guitar, lower my golf handicap, start and maintain a church, and travel around the world to see things I had only read about. It also gives you the opportunity to take better care of your health...less stress, more exercise, and frequent check ups. Life is short, don't waste it on the office if you don't have to. Believe it or not, you are replaceable there.
Not everyone enjoys retirement. My father was a physician, continued to practice medicine until his 70's. He kept saying "I'll retire tomorrow, but tomorrow has not arrived yet." He loved his patients, loved the challenges of medicine, loved providing care. He threatened retirement several times, but always came back. He did back off some, but loved the science and the chance to make people better.

There are places in which job holders are extremely difficult to replace; in another thread there is mention of Tulane med starting a nursing school to fill a drastic need, and the same goes with my specialty. There is a maldistribution of medical specialists; it is easier to get an audience with the Pope than it is to get certain specialists in the Southeastern U.S.
What if the Hokey Pokey really is what it's all about?
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GretnaGrn
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Re: Barbara Burke Retiring

Post by GretnaGrn »

AO Sig wrote: Fri Oct 21, 2022 7:45 am
Cheerleader wrote: Wed Oct 19, 2022 11:24 am
WaveProf wrote: Sat Oct 01, 2022 2:39 pm Retiring at 65 on the nose. I'll never understand, and always slightly wonder about, people who have the means to retire at 65 (or younger) and choose not to. Good for her.
You are right about that, Prof. I quit the rat race at 62 and never looked back. I have friends who are in their late 70's and still working. I also have friends who retired and wondering why they didn't do it earlier. No one ever says, "I wish I had kept working instead of retiring". If you can afford it, it gives you a whole new life. I got to learn to play the bass guitar, lower my golf handicap, start and maintain a church, and travel around the world to see things I had only read about. It also gives you the opportunity to take better care of your health...less stress, more exercise, and frequent check ups. Life is short, don't waste it on the office if you don't have to. Believe it or not, you are replaceable there.
Not everyone enjoys retirement. My father was a physician, continued to practice medicine until his 70's. He kept saying "I'll retire tomorrow, but tomorrow has not arrived yet." He loved his patients, loved the challenges of medicine, loved providing care. He threatened retirement several times, but always came back. He did back off some, but loved the science and the chance to make people better.

There are places in which job holders are extremely difficult to replace; in another thread there is mention of Tulane med starting a nursing school to fill a drastic need, and the same goes with my specialty. There is a maldistribution of medical specialists; it is easier to get an audience with the Pope than it is to get certain specialists in the Southeastern U.S.
The lack of certain medical specialists is true in New Orleans, as well. I can count on one hand the number of pediatric psychiatrists we have here, for example, as well as certain other specialties.

As for retirement, I think part of it is what you do for a living. If you're in a professional place where you have a lot of autonomy and truly enjoy what you do, it makes a big difference. I think doctors often (although certainly not always, and it depends on their specialties) have the opportunity to be in that sort of place, and it's a lot easier to see working until you can't in that context. If you're working for anyone else, though, it's very, very rare for there to be any good reason not to retire when you can.
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